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  • P-ISSN0023-3900
  • E-ISSN2733-9343

Vol.47 No.4

초록보기
Abstract

This paper intends to excavate and examine the long-forgotten natural-ization practices and policies of traditional Korea that existed beforethe advent of a single-raced nationalism, based on the transformationof Dangun from the first king into the biological ancestor of Koreans.The following three points will be made: first, the so-called ethnicnationalism that underlines the purity of Korean blood is not an inte-gral part of Korean tradition. Traditional Korea did not consider itselfto be ethnically homogeneous. In addition, it is erroneous to say thatKoreans lack a historical experience of living together with foreigners. Second, ethnic homogeneity in Korean nationalism is a relativelyrecent phenomenon. Korean nationalism was based on a profoundsense of cultural distinctiveness and superiority. The idea of Koreans asbeing the descendants of Dangun was originally introduced to empha-size the Korean political and cultural life as being old as that of China.Third, those who identify ethnic homogeneity as the main cause forprejudice and discrimination against foreigners are actually engagingthe wrong enemy, because the real cause is this very sense of being civi-lized and culturally superior. This is why multiculturalism is so easilyembraced by nationalists.

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Abstract

As the increase of foreign migrants in Korea transforms a single-ethnichomogenous Korean society into multiethnic and multicultural one,Korean government and the civil society pay close attention to multicul-turalism as an alternative value to their policy and social movement.This paper scrutinizes the realities of multiethnic and multiculturalshift in terms of the matrix of class, gender, ethnicity, and physicalspace in Korea, and takes note of multiple social actors creating multi-cultural milieu in Korea with contradictive policy agenda and politicalstances. This articles main thesis is that the current discourses andconcerns on multiculturalism in Korea are mere political rhetorics andslogans, not the constructive and analytical concepts for transforming asociety.

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Abstract

This paper provides an in-depth understanding of the current condi-tions and the status of migrant women in Korea by examining theKorean government policy relating to them. The rapid increase in thenumber of migrant women in recent years has initiated a new type offamily known as the multicultural family. This has also fuelled activediscussions about cultural diversity and multiculturalism. However, the concept of multicultural families is appropriated bythe Korean government, which does not recognize the different culturalbackgrounds and aspirations of migrant women, to cope with the mul-titude of social problems, such as declining birth rates, rising divorcerates, and sex ratio imbalances, in the marriage market. This paperargues that the multicultural family in Korea is a site where Korea as anation, civil society in Korea, and migrant women as a category strug-gle over the meaning of the term multicultural.

초록보기
Abstract

This paper provides an in-depth understanding of the current condi-tions and the status of migrant women in Korea by examining theKorean government policy relating to them. The rapid increase in thenumber of migrant women in recent years has initiated a new type offamily known as the multicultural family. This has also fuelled activediscussions about cultural diversity and multiculturalism. However, the concept of multicultural families is appropriated bythe Korean government, which does not recognize the different culturalbackgrounds and aspirations of migrant women, to cope with the mul-titude of social problems, such as declining birth rates, rising divorcerates, and sex ratio imbalances, in the marriage market. This paperargues that the multicultural family in Korea is a site where Korea as anation, civil society in Korea, and migrant women as a category strug-gle over the meaning of the term multicultural.

초록보기
Abstract

Against the backdrop of South Koreas economic growth, the collapse ofsocialist blocs, and the rise of globalization, foreign workers and over-seas Koreans are migrating to South Korea in large numbers, creatinglarge settlements of diverse ethnic and cultural groups. As internationalmarriages account for 12 percent of all marriages in South Korea, themyth of South Koreans ethnic and cultural homogeneity is crumbling.In addition, the possible huge influx of North Koreans to the Southcould send shockwaves of unprecedented magnitude through SouthKorean society in the future.In recognition of the increasing ethnic and cultural diversity inSouth Korean society, this paper aims to address how South Koreansociety should prepare itself in terms of ideology, institutions, and civilconsciousness in order to utilize its growing plurality as a driving forcefor social development. Toward this end, this paper reviews the discus-sions over multicultural citizenship and assesses its applicability toSouth Korean society. A review of the ideology, principles, institution,civil consciousness, and virtues of multicultural citizenship developedin other countries such as the United States, Canada, and Francereveals huge implications for dealing with the potential problems aris-ing from the increase of cultural and ethnic diversity in South Korea.

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Abstract

Any understanding of contemporary Korean society would not be com-plete without some knowledge of its religious culture. Just as Bud-dhism, Taoism, and Confucianism made important inroads in tradi-tional Korea, Protestant Christianity (particularly in its Pentecostalform), with its remarkable success story in Asia, has become exceeding-ly influential in modern Korea. Focusing on the elective affinitybetween neoliberal globalization and experiential spiritualities such asneo-Pentecostalism, I focus on some aspects of generalized Pentecostalbeliefs and practices within Korea in this paper. I then discuss the caus-es, strengths, and weaknesses of the pentecostalization of Koreanchurches in order to clarify the role of Korean Christianity in worldChristianity and in global society. In the conclusion, I address the fol-lowing questions: How can we understand the growth of Korean neo-Pentecostal Christianity under globalization? What might be the futureof Korean Protestant Christianity?

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Abstract

Improved Korea-U.S. relations would serve the interests of both nationsand promote global/regional peace and stability. Therefore, the twonations should work together to alleviate anti-Americanism in Korea. Akey to accomplishing this task is for the United States to adequatelyunderstand its nature, origin, evolution, and political implications. Thispaper argues that the anti-Americanism articulated as an ideologyemerged during and after the Gwangju Uprising in 1980, and that thesubsequent ideological/intellectual struggles have spawned two distinctactivist groups: the Self-Reliance faction with pro-DPRK leanings, andthe Equality faction of both the anti-war and anti-neoliberal globaliza-tion lines. It emphasizes the significance of the newly-established anti-American social networks and a policy change on the part of the UnitedStates as well. This paper places utmost importance on the policy impli-cations of distinguishing between these two camps of social activists. Ina nutshell, it is argued that the U.S. policy-makers need to be keenlyaware that whether anti-Americanism will increase or die out in Koreagreatly depends on an accurate understanding of both the nature andconsequences of Korean social/political changes and policy decisionsthat take such an understanding into consideration.

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Abstract

In this paper, the author reviews commonalities and differences in thedistortions of history by Japan and China and also analyzes the politi-cal implications and structure, ultimately to show how the process canbe linked with bringing peace to Northeast Asia. Based on this analy-sis, solutions are sought to address the disputes over history betweenKorea, China, and Japan. In the long term, the historical debates can be addressed by estab-lishing common historical perception based on academic research. Thisis possible when causes for debates such as the Sino-Japanese strugglefor hegemony and the Gando issue raised by Korea are eliminated.Another premise is Japanese reflection on its modern history of aggres-sion. What matters is to put words into action by calling on Japan toreflect upon the history of aggression in an effort to broaden commonhistorical understanding among the three countries civil societies andjointly defending the Japanese pacifist constitution as a universalvalue. When those issues are resolved, the sharing of East Asian historycan realize its true significance of peaceful coexistence.

Korea Journal